Sr Margaret Theresa SLG

As a child I loved working on our family farm, on the Norfolk/Suffolk border and I would have liked to continue with that way of life. I felt close to God in the fields, and my initial call came when I was about 14 stacking bales of straw; it is still very vivid in my mind.

Sr Margaret Theresa SLG

Who are the Sisters of the Love of God?

The Community of the Sisters of the Love of God is a contemplative community of women founded in 1906 within the Anglican Church, to witness to the priority of God, and to respond to the love of God for us, reflected in our love for God. Its members believe they are called to live a substantial degree of withdrawal from everyday life, devoting themselves to prayer in the belief that this prayer, rooted in the praise and worship of God, is essential for the peace and well-being of the world. The Sisters offer their lives to God in prayer and daily life together in Community, seeking to deepen their relationship with Jesus Christ and with one another. Sisters add the suffix SLG to their religious names.

The Community has always drawn upon Carmelite spirituality: life and prayer in silence and solitude is a very important dimension of the vocation. However, the Community also draws from other traditions, and the Rule is not specifically Carmelite. Another important ingredient is an emphasis on the centrality of Divine Office and Eucharist together in choir, inspired partly by the Benedictine way of life.

My Early Years

I was born into a Methodist family in Norfolk and so Nuns were not part of my childhood.  But I did hear that a teacher at a nearby primary school had disappeared into a convent at Ditchingham, about twenty miles away; it all seemed rather hush hush to an eleven-year-old.  We were quite a serious Methodist family and usually went to Chapel twice and sometimes three times on a Sunday. As a child I loved working on our family farm, on the Norfolk/Suffolk border and I would have liked to continue with that way of life. I felt close to God in the fields, and my initial call came when I was about 14 stacking bales of straw; it is still very vivid in my mind. But I realized that I did not have the strength to do some of the work, and music was beginning to occupy an increasing amount of my time; that also seemed to speak of God. 

My Studies and Working Life

I continued my studies and qualified as a music teacher to secondary school pupils.I was a student first in Colchester and then for my teaching year, in Birmingham. One of my school friends studied at Leeds university and lived in a hostel run by the Community of the Resurrection whose mother house is at Mirfield in Yorkshire. He had come under the influence of the more catholic wing of the Church of England while in Leeds and invited his less high church friends in Norfolk to worship at our local ‘high’ church. The first such service that I went to was Midnight Mass and it made a deep impression. I was having doubts about remaining a member of the Methodist Church (mainly because the sacraments, especially the Eucharist, were becoming increasingly important to me) and I began worshipping as an Anglican just before going to Birmingham, where I was Confirmed in my mid-twenties.

Nurturing My Vocation to Religious Life

It was at this church in Birmingham that my vocation to the Religious Life was nurtured, I think.  I began saying Office a number of times during the day and sometimes with others at Church; it began to feel as though it was to this that God might be calling me. I also began to visit to Religious Communities not only for retreat, but also to ‘suss them out’, with a possibility of perhaps testing my vocation. uring my early teaching days, I moved into a larger bedsit and when I went to pray for the first time, knew I wanted to serve God in a way that meant I would never marry. It took me a few years to be as sure as one can be that it was to Fairacres that God was calling me, and here I remain. 
Sisters of the Love of God
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